Ecola State Park, Oregon Coast

Went on our first getaway just the two of us to Cannon Beach for a night. We wanted to do lots of hiking, but kinda got rained out the first day. The second day we got to hike Ecola State Trailhead to Indian Beach Trailhead. It was only about a 2 hour hike, taking our time, soaking everything in. It was pretty muddy, but a really beautiful and fun hike. Lots of diversity, you start out in the woods and end up hiking with a view of the coast sometimes, and then there’s lots of up and down and winding. You know,… Hiking lol, I’m doing a poor job of describing it, so you should just go for yourself. It was breathtaking and refreshing. I want to go again already. If you look closely in one of the pictures you can see some campers all the way down by the rocks. I don’t know how they got down there! And I certainly have no clue how they’ll get out haha.

decepticun:

Laego di Bitabergh | by Max Tremolizzo

These are some photos I took from today with my Nikon. The others were from an iPhone. Definitely captures the beauty better, but still doesn’t do it justice.

Hiking some trails in Oswald West State Park today. We saw a lot of surfers cause the trails led to a more secluded part of Cannon Beach. After we went and got Insomnia! Hemp vanilla lattes FTW! Oregon is finally sunny, but I definitely had layers on cause with all the tree coverage, it was cold. I love Oregon, it is so beautiful.

awkwardsituationist:

elephants are conspicuously expressive and joyful creatures. when celebrating a birth or reuniting with old acquaintances, elephants will intertwine their trunks together and engage in friendly trunk wrestling. when trying to console a loved one, elephants will stroke or caress each others’ heads and backs with their trunks.

demonstrations of true consolation in animals are rare, and has only been documented in the great apes, canines, and some corvids. this might be because complex cognitive abilities are required for consolation, such as the ability to empathically take the perspective of another. elephants are one of the few animals to pass the mirror test.

with their strong social bonds, it’s not surprising that elephants show concern for others. elephants get distressed when they see others in distress, reaching out to calm them down. the consistency with which elephants responded to a friend in distress is quite remarkable. rarely does an elephant give a distress call without a response from a friend or group member nearby.

photos by mario moreno. some text from a february 2014 wired article

(via bgirlstarfire)

Seen at Insomnia Coffee - Tanasbourne

Seen at Insomnia Coffee - Tanasbourne